"It's not a spectator sport!"

 

Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) Austrian

Sigmund. 1856-1939. Austrian physician and founder of psychoanalysis who theorized that the symptoms of hysterical patients represent forgotten and unresolved infantile psychosexual conflicts. His psychoanalytic theories, which initially met with hostility, profoundly influenced 20th-century thought. [99dic]

Henri Bergson (1859-1941) French,

[Don't underestimate the influence of Bergson!] 

Henri Louis. 1859-1941. French philosopher and writer whose widely influential works, including Creative Evolution (1907) and The Creative Mind (1934), largely concern the importance of intuition as a means of attaining knowledge and the élan vital present in all living things. He won the 1927 Nobel Prize for literature.  [99dic]

                George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) Dublin  B62/Russell/1945/p791: -Bergson's irrationalism made a wide appeal -to Bernard Shaw, whose "Back to Methuselah" is pure Bergsonism  -B exemplifies revolt against reason which, beginning with Rousseau, has gradually dominated larger and larger areas in the life and thought of the world.

George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Dublin, Fabian,

Shaw, George Bernard. 1856-1950. Irish-born British playwright. A founder of the Fabian Society, he wrote plays of iconoclastic social criticism, including Arms and the Man (1894), Pygmalion (1913), and Saint Joan (1923). He won the 1925 Nobel Prize for literature. [99dic]

                George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) Dublin  wb:  Shaw agreed with Darwin's evolution but, influenced by Samuel Butler and Henri Bergson, added an "intelligence factor" or Life Force. - The Life force struggles to gain the upper hand over matter and will eventually succeed and man will become Superman.  Until it happens, though, only the occasional artistic or intellectual rebel manages to become independent of matter and society.

                George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) Dublin  B62/Russell/1945/p791: -Bergson's irrationalism made a wide appeal -to Bernard Shaw, whose "Back to Methuselah" is pure Bergsonism  -B exemplifies revolt against reason which, beginning with Rousseau, has gradually dominated larger and larger areas in the life and thought of the world.

Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951)

1885-1951. American novelist who satirized middle-class America in his 22 works, including Babbitt (1922) and Elmer Gantry (1927). He was the first American to receive (1930) a Nobel Prize for literature. [99dic]

Al Jolson (1886-1950) Russian American Entertainer

Al. 1886-1950. American entertainer who starred in The Jazz Singer (1927), the first major film with synchronized sound.

 

Frank Chodorov (1887-1966)

Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953) USA,

Mouring Becomes Electra, A Long Day's Journey into Night.

Eugene Gladstone. 1888-1953. American playwright. Among his works are Mourning Becomes Electra (1931) and Long Day's Journey into Night (produced 1956). He won the 1936 Nobel Prize for literature. [99dic]

C. S. Lewis, (1898-1963) British

Lewis, C(live) S(taples). 1898-1963. British writer and critic. His works include The Allegory of Love (1936) and a series of fictional books for children collectively known as The Chronicles of Narnia (1950-1956).

Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979) German USA

Herbert. 1898-1979. German-born American political philosopher whose works of social criticism include Eros and Civilization (1955) and One-Dimensional Man (1964). [99dic]

Ayatullah Ruhollah Khomeini (1900-1989) Iran

Ayatollah Ruholla. 1900-1989. Iranian Shiite leader and head of state (1979-1989). Arrested (1963) and exiled (1964) for his opposition to Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi's regime, he returned to Iran on the shah's downfall (1979) and established a new constitution giving himself supreme powers. His reign was marked by a return to strict observance of the Islamic code. [99dic]

George Orwell (1903-1950) British, Animal Farm, 1984,

George. Pen name of Eric Arthur Blair. 1903-1950. British writer whose imaginative fiction attacks totalitarianism and reflects his concern with social justice. His works include Animal Farm (1945) and 1984 (1949). [99dic]

Decries Newspeak

Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980, Apr. 15)

Jean Paul. 1905-1980. French writer and philosopher. A leading existentialist, he wrote literary works, such as the autobiographical novel Nausea (1938) and the play No Exit (1944), and philosophical volumes that include Being and Nothingness (1943). Sartre declined the 1957 Nobel Prize for literature.

 [99dic]

Norman O. Brown (1913-) Mexican British USA

not in [99dic]

Idi Amin (1923?-2003)

utterly ruthless former dictator of Uganda, a Muslem. 

not in [99dic]